Global Warming: Can Existing Reserves Really Preserve Current Levels of Biological Diversity?

Year of publication: 2006


Paleoecological evidence and paleoclimatic records indicate that there was a plant poleward migration in latitude and an upward shift in elevation with increased temperatures after the last glaciation. Recent studies have shown that global warming over the past 100 years has been having a noticeable effect on living systems.
Current global warming is causing a poleward and upward shift in the range of many plants and animals.
Climate change, in connection with other global changes, is threatening the survival of a wide range of plant and animal species. This raises the question: can existing reserves really preserve current levels of biological diversity in the long term given the present rapid pace of climate change? The present paper deals with this question in the context of the responses of plants and animals to global climate change, based on a literature review. Consequently, we recommend expanding reserves towards the poles and/or towards higher altitudes, to permit species to shift their ranges to keep pace with global warming.

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Cover filmFor hermits and fire salamanders - How municipalities connect habitats in the Alps. DVD, 2012, CIPRA International

 

 

 

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